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LEAF & PETAL PLATES Silicone is commonly used in bakeware for its heat resistant and flexible nature. These leaf plates are made of food safe silicone making them ideal for serving and a fun and reusable alternative to paper plates for your next dinner party or picnic. Microwave, oven (up to 400 degrees) and dishwasher safe. No sharp knives please.

LEAF & PETAL PLATES

Silicone is commonly used in bakeware for its heat resistant and flexible nature. These leaf plates are made of food safe silicone making them ideal for serving and a fun and reusable alternative to paper plates for your next dinner party or picnic. Microwave, oven (up to 400 degrees) and dishwasher safe. No sharp knives please.

JET, WHITBY (Jacqueline Cullen Jewelry) Jet was one of the first gems to be discovered by man.  It is fossilized wood formed over 180 millions of years by the pressures of burial.  Quality Jet was mined in its heyday in the late 1800s in the coastal town of Whitby, England.  Whitby Jet is now very rare - Jacqueline Cullen’s supplier climbs down the cliffs on a rope collecting raw samples from the disused mines and ancient caves.  Jet’s blackness is so intense so came the expression “black as Jet.”  Like marble, it takes immense skill to carve and work with Jet.  It is also lighter than it appears, allowing for wearable bold shapes.  Most often, Jet is associated with Victorian jewelry which was popularized by Queen Victoria who wore jewelry made of Jet as part of her black mourning dress after the passing of her late husband, Prince Albert in 1861.   Still a Chariots on Fire favorite - our fascination with antique jet Jewelry was what started it all! CARE INSTRUCTIONS:  Whitby Jet is soft and delicate - avoid contact with detergents, chemicals and cosmetics.  Clean by wiping with a soft damp cloth to remove acids from perspiration.  Whitby Jet can be damaged if knocked or dropped.  With care and love, jet jewelry will offer many lifetime of wear. 

JET, WHITBY
(Jacqueline Cullen Jewelry)

Jet was one of the first gems to be discovered by man.  It is fossilized wood formed over 180 millions of years by the pressures of burial.  Quality Jet was mined in its heyday in the late 1800s in the coastal town of Whitby, England. 

Whitby Jet is now very rare - Jacqueline Cullen’s supplier climbs down the cliffs on a rope collecting raw samples from the disused mines and ancient caves.  Jet’s blackness is so intense so came the expression “black as Jet.”  Like marble, it takes immense skill to carve and work with Jet.  It is also lighter than it appears, allowing for wearable bold shapes. 

Most often, Jet is associated with Victorian jewelry which was popularized by Queen Victoria who wore jewelry made of Jet as part of her black mourning dress after the passing of her late husband, Prince Albert in 1861.  

Still a Chariots on Fire favorite - our fascination with antique jet Jewelry was what started it all!

CARE INSTRUCTIONS:  Whitby Jet is soft and delicate - avoid contact with detergents, chemicals and cosmetics.  Clean by wiping with a soft damp cloth to remove acids from perspiration.  Whitby Jet can be damaged if knocked or dropped.  With care and love, jet jewelry will offer many lifetime of wear. 

MAKOTO KAGOSHIMA Artist Makoto Kagoshima, based in the southern, tropical tip of Japan, individually illustrates whimsical and heart-warming motifs making each piece one-of-a-kind works of art.  He draws inspiration from travels and his love for Roman sculptures and architecture.  As an avid gardener, motifs such as pansies, roses and dianthus flowers appear throughout his designs with occasional appearances of butterflies, owls and other fantastical creatures.  Makoto Kagoshima’s plates are food safe and make wonderful centerpieces for the home or the table. Chariots on Fire exclusively carries Makoto Makoshima's ceramics in the USA. CARE INSTRUCTIONS:  All plates are food safe (Makoto uses natural glazes).  Hand wash and dry completely.  Do not microwave or place in the oven as the high heat may damage the glazes used.

MAKOTO KAGOSHIMA

Artist Makoto Kagoshima, based in the southern, tropical tip of Japan, individually illustrates whimsical and heart-warming motifs making each piece one-of-a-kind works of art.  He draws inspiration from travels and his love for Roman sculptures and architecture.  As an avid gardener, motifs such as pansies, roses and dianthus flowers appear throughout his designs with occasional appearances of butterflies, owls and other fantastical creatures. 

Makoto Kagoshima’s plates are food safe and make wonderful centerpieces for the home or the table.

Chariots on Fire exclusively carries Makoto Makoshima's ceramics in the USA.

CARE INSTRUCTIONS:  All plates are food safe (Makoto uses natural glazes).  Hand wash and dry completely.  Do not microwave or place in the oven as the high heat may damage the glazes used.

MILAGROS (MIRACLES) (dosa Heart Garlands) Inspired by milagros (miracles) religious folk charms found at the Basiilica de la Soledad in Oaxaca, Mexico, dosa’s Milagro project was founded as a means of providing employment for local women near Oaxaca and to make use of the smallest textile scraps from dosa’s fashion production (not a single dosa textile scrap goes to waste).  To date over 74,000 hearts have been made using more than 410 pounds of dosa remnants. These hearts are made from the scraps of fabric from dosa’s Spring Summer 2015 collection featuring illustrations by Makoto Kagoshima.  Each garland contains 24 hearts and is about 63 inches long.

MILAGROS (MIRACLES)
(dosa Heart Garlands)


Inspired by milagros (miracles) religious folk charms found at the Basiilica de la Soledad in Oaxaca, Mexico, dosa’s Milagro project was founded as a means of providing employment for local women near Oaxaca and to make use of the smallest textile scraps from dosa’s fashion production (not a single dosa textile scrap goes to waste).  To date over 74,000 hearts have been made using more than 410 pounds of dosa remnants.

These hearts are made from the scraps of fabric from dosa’s Spring Summer 2015 collection featuring illustrations by Makoto Kagoshima.  Each garland contains 24 hearts and is about 63 inches long.

GRAINNE MORTON "My creativity comes from my culture: traditional crafts, folklore, music and fairy tales. Culture is embedded in my practice" We've had our eye on Grainne's work for some time and we are thrilled to be working together. Grainne's designs redefines the true meaning of luxury and preciousness. Grainne has an eye for "junk" (Antique findings - she was raised in a family of antique dealers) and reassembles these precious "parts" into something very special and one-of-a-kind. Grainne is an award-winning goldsmith and designer based in Edinburgh, where she lives and works with her husband and two children.

GRAINNE MORTON

"My creativity comes from my culture: traditional crafts, folklore, music and fairy tales. Culture is embedded in my practice"

We've had our eye on Grainne's work for some time and we are thrilled to be working together.

Grainne's designs redefines the true meaning of luxury and preciousness. Grainne has an eye for "junk" (Antique findings - she was raised in a family of antique dealers) and reassembles these precious "parts" into something very special and one-of-a-kind.

Grainne is an award-winning goldsmith and designer based in Edinburgh, where she lives and works with her husband and two children.

POLLY WALES Polly, who spent her formative years in London and free-spirited Brighton in England, always had a strong affinity for the arts. She studied sculpture early on and later studied jewelry at The Royal College of Art in London. Although Polly is a classically trained fine artist, she has always had a penchant for breaking the mold. “I found that jewerly, rather than sculpture, allowed me to make pieces that spoke directly to more people…I loved making for making’s sake and creating a final product from an aesthetic view point rather than one based on theory and rules,” she says. Through jewerly, Polly set out to make pieces that molded and evolved along with the person wearing it. The treasured relationship with the piece of jewerly would become more and more precious over the years. Polly directly casts sapphires and diamonds (most often gems are "set" in place) which results in her unique signature look.

POLLY WALES

Polly, who spent her formative years in London and free-spirited Brighton in England, always had a strong affinity for the arts. She studied sculpture early on and later studied jewelry at The Royal College of Art in London. Although Polly is a classically trained fine artist, she has always had a penchant for breaking the mold.

“I found that jewerly, rather than sculpture, allowed me to make pieces that spoke directly to more people…I loved making for making’s sake and creating a final product from an aesthetic view point rather than one based on theory and rules,” she says.

Through jewerly, Polly set out to make pieces that molded and evolved along with the person wearing it. The treasured relationship with the piece of jewerly would become more and more precious over the years.

Polly directly casts sapphires and diamonds (most often gems are "set" in place) which results in her unique signature look.

MARIANNE ANDERSON

Inspired by the tradition of ornament, goldsmith, Marianne Anderson, skillfully arranges classic Victorian motifs and materials - silver, gold, freshwater pearls and garnets into a luxurious and contemporary collection. 

Marianne's “blackened” (oxidized) signature finish will naturally polish and accentuate with detail over time. Most metals naturally tarnish over time, requiring buffing and polishing to maintain luster.  Oxidation speeds up this process to create an even “blackened” finish which, with use, will slowly polish to reveal the true color of sterling silver. 

Marianne Anderson is a graduate of the Glasgow School of Art and exhibits internationally.

“Far from superfluous, ornament has always had its own vocabulary and meaning and I try to engage with this through my work.” - Marianne Anderson.